Far from Home
decimonono:

1901. Santos-Dumont airship passing the Eiffel Tower (por Nationaal Archief)

decimonono:

1901. Santos-Dumont airship passing the Eiffel Tower (por Nationaal Archief)

sulphuriclike:

Andrew Wyeth_Distant Thunder_1961

sulphuriclike:

Andrew Wyeth_Distant Thunder_1961

stancarey:

Remedios Varo, Encounter (1959), oil on canvas, 64 cm x 45 cm

stancarey:

Remedios Varo, Encounter (1959), oil on canvas, 64 cm x 45 cm

atlasobscura:

OAK BEAMS, NEW COLLEGE OXFORD

Founded in 1379, New College, Oxford is one of the oldest Oxford colleges. It has, like other colleges, a great dining hall with huge oak beams across the top, as large as two feet square, and forty-five feet long each.

A century ago, some busy entomologist went up into the roof of the dining hall with a penknife and poked at the beams and found that they were full of beetles. This was reported to the College Council, which met the news with some dismay, beams this large were now very hard, if not impossible to come by. “Where would they get beams of that caliber?” they worried.

One of the Junior Fellows stuck his neck out and suggested that there might be some worthy oaks on the College lands. These colleges are endowed with pieces of land scattered across the country which are run by a college Forester. They called in the College Forester, who of course had not been near the college itself for some years, and asked him if there were any oaks for possible use.

He pulled his forelock and said, “Well sirs, we was wonderin’ when you’d be askin’.”

Upon further inquiry it was discovered that when the College was founded, a grove of oaks had been planted to replace the beams in the dining hall when they became beetly, because oak beams always become beetly in the end. This plan had been passed down from one Forester to the next for over five hundred years saying “You don’t cut them oaks. Them’s for the College Hall.”

For more details, and other fascinating histories, visit Atlas Obscura.

antipahtico:

The Three Norns Winding The Rope Of Fate ~ Arthur Rackham 1910

antipahtico:

The Three Norns Winding The Rope Of Fate ~ Arthur Rackham 1910

beingblog:

“As Ojibwe women, we’re responsible for the water. It’s our responsibility to care for the water, to pray for the water, to sing for the water, to gather the water and then lift those petitions up to the spirits and especially to the water spirits.”

— Sharon Day